Reflections

A Magazine of Theological and Ethical Inquiry from Yale Divinity School

Refugees

Author: 
Adam Zagajewski

bent under burdens which sometimes
can be seen and sometimes can’t,
they trudge through mud or desert sands,
hunched, hungry,

silent men in heavy jackets,
dressed for all four seasons,
old women with crumpled faces,
clutching something – a child, the family
lamp, the last loaf of bread?

It could be Bosnia today,
Poland in September ’39, France
eight months later, Germany in ’45,
Somalia, Afghanistan, Egypt.

There’s always a wagon or at least a wheelbarrow
full of treasures (a quilt, a silver cup,
the fading scent of home),
a car out of gas marooned in a ditch,
a horse (soon left behind), snow, a lot of snow,
too much snow, too much sun, too much rain,

and always that special slouch
as if leaning toward another, better planet,
with less ambitious generals,
less snow, less wind, fewer cannons,
less History (alas, there’s no
such planet, just that slouch).

Shuffling their feet,
they move slowly, very slowly
toward the country of nowhere,
and the city of no one
on the river of never.

Issue Title: 
Who is my Neighbor? Facing Immigration
Issue Year: 
2008